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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
-term spending cuts continues. >> republicans and democrats in washington are still fighting over taxes and spending but they've agreed to keep the fight under control. house already passed a bill to keep the government running past the end of this month. now the senate is preparing to do the same thing and there, the two parties aren't far apart on the details. >> we've con ens didded the number of amendments being talked about seriously. i commend them and their staff through all of their efforts. >> i spoke with them this morning. they've yet to reach an agreement. >> but the gap remains huge for a long-term plan for bringing government spending and revenue inline. >> they'll reduce the entitlement programs but only if republicans agree to tax hikes and jepd speaker john boehner said the house's answer to that is no. >> the president got his tax heights on january 1st. the talk about raising revenue is over. it's time to deal with the spending problem. >> the two chambers have a way of talking about their differences, not with president obama but on each other. work on the contrastin
to tax its bank depositors. the euro falls to its lowest level since november. >>> ben bernanke and the fed get down to business. what should we expect after its two-day meeting ends tomorrow? we'll ask former federal reserve governor randy crosser in. >> and what does the ceo of one of the world's iconic brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watch
, certainly, this is a place that advertised discretion and what they call tax optimization. and they did have lower corporate tax rates. so there are legitimate reasons to put your money here. but, also, previous governments than the current one, they wanted to be a international financial center. they worked very hard to attract capital from all over the world. it is the business model of this country. but it's not going to be very for long. they just can't do it anymore. >>> one statistic to leave you with. the banking system is so much larger here in cyprus, if we wanted to have one in the united states that was as large equivalent to our economy, we would need 45 more jpmorgans. that's how much bigger we would have to get to match the size that they've done here relative to the size of this place. >> thank you very much. >>> well, a big bipartisan vote at the capital, the senate overwhelmingly passed a massive stop-gap spending bill that will keep washington up and running through the end of september. it leaves federal spending cuts in place. but that could mean job furloughs for hundred
which is positive and may be offsetting in terms of what washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let's dig deeper. do you think that the level of profit growth will not justify any real further expansion of the price earnings multiple or what? >> i would say the first part, yes. if you look at profits they are very, very strong and have been for a while but it is a maturing earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than avera
will not recognize in the many programs a same-sex marriage that is recognized by the state. in terms of estate tax and benefits, some 1,000 programs. if a couple is legally married in the eyes of its is state, it is not married in the eyes of the federal government. that is a new policy for the federal government. prop 8 only speaks to california and bans same-sex marriage in california. >> scott: vik, they are different, but intersect. we will learn about what the justices feel about doma on tuesday when they ask questions about prop 8. what are the legal even tantangs here? >> jane is correct. the supreme court could strike one down without affecting the other. their way is to do that. both at the procedural level and substantive lae substantive level, there are comm commonalities. how do we defend a statute, the president and attorney general and governor, decline to defend? in both of these, the elected executive officials declined. that is a common question. on marriage, at base, the cases ask a fundamental question of protection under the 14th amendment. how skeptical should the court be on
in congress especially in the senate. they did rise above a lot of the special interests with tax reform and fixing the social security system. they managed to survive re-election. if you take principled positions, stand up for them, explain them to your constituents, you know, maybe they'll raise more money by refusing the wall street guys and going to the main street constituents who vote for them. i think at the end of the day they'll sleep better at night t too. >> that's all the more reason to read "bull by the horns." sheila bear, thank you very much for what you're doing and for being with me today. >> thanks for having me. ♪ >>> it's not only our banking system that remains questionable and shaky, it's the whole of our economy, that complex mix master of capital and labor, prices and production, goods and services, rewards and punishments, largely driven by private decisions in what has been defined, mythologically, as "the free market." capitalism t, it turns out, is a capital idea if you have the capital. which brings us back to richard wolf. i say "back" because as many of y
's remember what just happened. the payroll tax going away, the sequester that's really going to start hitting in april. therefore the second quarter. so earnings in the short term might seem weak, but we do believe over the next couple years, the earnings story could be strong, especially when you look at the economy and the fundamental story what's happening with housing and slowly what's happening to jobs. >> so where should i put my money, andress? if i want to be a broadly diversified global investor, what percentage of it right now of my equity holdings should be in the u.s. market and what percentage in foreign markets, what percentage in emerging markets? >> so first off, we are overweight in the u.s. equity markets over, for instance, other developed economies like europe. i think a lot of the headline risk is going to actually send a lot of dollars back into the united states. and fundamentally, the u.s. economic story is improving. but just a comment on emerging markets. you hit on something that i think is important. i think most investors globally are structurally underweight emer
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)